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Level 2 permitted agreements

edited April 2012 in Bridge Laws
In "Standard English Modern Acol" System file it states on page 21that a suit overcall shows around 8-18 HCP with a respectable 5- card suit usually with a least 2 honours. In the "Orange Book 2006" page 58 it states natural suit overcalls are permitted showing a minimum of 4 cards in the suit bid.
At a recent club event (ours is considered level 2) a member overcalled with a 4 card suit, a queen and total of 8 points. Was this a) permissible and b) legal for our club level?

Comments

  • Your club can decide whatever it wishes. This is a regulation not a law.

    The regulation in the EBU';s Orange Book says
    "Allowed at Levels 2, 3 and 4
    11 N 2 Natural suit overcalls
    Natural suit overcalls are permitted showing a minimum of four cards in the suit bid."

    That is, of course, not the same as it being good bridge so the answers are

    A. Yes
    B. Yes unless your club explicitly forbids it.
  • This seems amazingly sensible - giving a club some leeway. Why are the contentious issues like redealing passed-out boards, and removing the board from the centre of the table not like this? I am sick to death of being the TD in the middle, between the 'strict laws of the EBU' on one hand, and 'let's keep it relaxed and friendly' on the other - and I bet I am not alone in this!
  • The EBU have no say in the matter of leaving the board in the centre of the table -- this is in the Laws of Contract Bridge. As for redealing a passed-out board, surely your members can see the logic behind this -- just because the first table passed it out does not mean that everyone will. If this happens for more than about a board every five or so sessions, your members are not shuffling properly.

    It is very possible to keep the board in the centre and leave passed-out hands alone and still have a "relaxed and friendly" game.
  • There is a difference between regulation(e.g. what methods you can play) and laws. Regulations are the responsibility of the regulating authority, the EBU for tournaments, the club for its evening game and on the other hand the laws of the game which cover such things as not redealing(Law 22A) and where the board is (Law 7). whatever they are they are not the "strict laws of the EBU" The Laws are produced by the World Bridge Federation.
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